Editing New Funding Means Carbon Expand Beyond 3D-print Tooth Straighteners Football Helmets And Running Shoes

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id="article-body" class="row" section="article-body"> Carbon 3D prints these springy, lightweight lattices used in Adidas running shoes.<br><br>Stephen Shankland/CNET Carbon already sells 3D printers used to make unusual the materials inside Riddell's custom-size professional-league football helmets and Adidas running shoes. Now, a new $260 million funding round should help the Silicon Valley startup create even more unusual materials. <br><br>Among the new possibilities, according to [http://browse.deviantart.com/?q=Chief%20Executive Chief Executive] Joseph DeSimone:<br><br><br>Products made from multiple materials with different properties and colors directly injected into different parts of the design. For [http://www.angelnailslithia.com/ nail salon near me l nail salons near me l nail spa near me l nails spa near me] example, they could make dentures with separate materials for the base and the teeth in one process instead of gluing the two components together.<br><br>Products that are easier to recycle. One example: Dental models people wear to gradually straighten their teeth, which end up in landfills today.<br><br>Larger products that don't sacrifice the fine details and smooth surfaces the company can create today.<br>Also called additive manufacturing, 3D printing got an early foothold as a way to [https://twitter.com/search?q=design%20prototypes&src=typd design prototypes]. Since then, it's also  crept into production lines for finished products. The unusual shapes of 3D-printed elements let companies build plastic components that are lighter than metal alternatives but couldn't be made with conventional injection molding methods, for example.<br><br>The result is a potentially dramatic change to what's possible in manufacturing -- more flexibility, more advanced designs, custom-tuned material properties and components that are built in one pass instead of assembled from a collection of parts. People on a Mars mission could build replacement parts as needed instead of carrying an inventory of everything. Oh, and yeah, people can 3D print guns.
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id="article-body" class="row" section="article-body"> Carbon 3D prints these springy, lightweight lattices used in Adidas [http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/public/sitesearch.do?querystring=running%20shoes running shoes].<br><br>Stephen Shankland/CNET Carbon already sells 3D printers used to make unusual the materials inside Riddell's custom-size professional-league football helmets and Adidas running shoes. Now, a new $260 million funding round should help the Silicon Valley startup create even more unusual materials. <br><br>Among the new possibilities, according to Chief Executive Joseph DeSimone:<br><br><br>Products made from multiple materials with different properties and colors directly injected into different parts of the design. For example, they could make dentures with separate materials for the base and the teeth in one process instead of gluing the two components together.<br><br>Products that are easier to recycle. One example: Dental models people wear to gradually straighten their teeth, which end up in landfills today.<br><br>Larger products that don't sacrifice the fine details and smooth surfaces the company can create today.<br>Also called additive manufacturing, 3D printing got an early foothold as a way to design prototypes. Since then, it's also  crept into production lines for [http://classicnailtallahassee.com/ nail salon near me l nail salons near me l nail spa near me l nails spa near me] finished products. The unusual shapes of 3D-printed elements let companies build plastic components that are lighter than metal alternatives but couldn't be made with conventional injection molding methods, for example.<br><br>The result is a potentially dramatic change to what's possible in manufacturing -- more flexibility, more advanced designs, custom-tuned material properties and components that are built in one pass instead of assembled from a collection of parts. People on a Mars mission could build replacement parts as needed instead of carrying an inventory of everything. Oh, and yeah, people can 3D print guns.

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